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Category Archives: Grammar

Lie versus lay

This is a topic that native speakers struggle with, too. When do we use “lie” and when do we use “lay”? Well, I received this nice little chart from Grammarbook.com today and wanted to share it with you. Does it help? And while you’re reading the explanations, you might like to subscribe to their newsletter, too? And here’s aContinue Reading

There, their or they’re?

Do you know when to use “there”, “their” and “they’re”? A lot of people get confused, so if you’re one of them, take a look at Merriam-Webster’s short video clip. And just take a quick look how one can use these words correctly: There is a very important question that needs to be asked. Take a lookContinue Reading

None is left or none are left?

Is the word “none” singular or plural? That is the question. Merriam-Webster’s short video clip is here to answer it for you.

Between you, me, and the gatepost

The grammatically correct phrase is “Between you and me” and not “Between you and I“. So you can imagine how surprised I was to read that some very well-known authors (like Mark Twain, William Shakespeare, Henry Fielding, Ben Jonson and Thomas Moore) have used the phrase incorrectly (read the article on merriam-webster.com). If you wantContinue Reading

More common confusing words

The English language is full of commonly confused words. These words may sound the same but mean different things. Listen to this audio clip and learn the difference this time between “bear” and “bare” and  “sight”, “site” and “cite”.

Reported speech

“They say reported speech is easy“. That’s the title of VOA’s audio on reported speech. When we want to tell someone what someone else has said, we can do so in two ways. One is to use exactly the same words the speaker used and to use quotation marks. That is called “direct speech”. The otherContinue Reading

English can be tricky

The English language is full of commonly confused words. These words may sound the same but mean different things. Listen to this audio clip and learn the difference between “lay” and “lie”, “affect” and “effect”, and “than” and “then”.

British versus American English

British and American English have far more similarities than differences. But it’s still good to know how the languages differ. Listen to this audio clip discussing the differences. Did you know them all? I didn’t realise that the Americans don’t use “tag questions” as often as we Brits do. I use them a lot. Do you?

Commonly confused words

The English language is full of commonly confused words. These words may sound the same but mean different things. Listen to this audio clip and learn the difference between “further” and “farther”, “lose” and “loose”, and “accept” and “except”.        

It’s or its?

Is it ‘its’ or ‘it’s’? So many people struggle with this. I was surprised to read here that Jane Austen did, too. On the other hand, I think we probably all make this mistake now and again. There’s really very little difference – just a little apostrophe! 😉 ‘Its’ shows possession. ‘It’s’ means ‘it is’.