Remember those nice words?

We spoke about euphemisms (in German: ‘beschönigende Umschreibungen’) about a month ago. Do you remember? They are those topics we don’t like talking about, because they make us feel uncomfortable. And to avoid using these rather harsh-sounding words, we choose to use more positive and polite-sounding ones.

So instead of saying that you are going to the “toilet”, you can say that you’re going to the “ladies” or to the “gents”. And instead of saying that someone is “obese” or “overweight”, you can say that s/he has a “fuller figure”.

More euphemisms

We spoke about euphemisms (in German: ‘beschönigende Umschreibungen’) about a month ago. Do you remember? They are those topics we don’t like talking about, because they make us feel uncomfortable. And to avoid using these rather harsh-sounding words, we choose to use more positive and polite-sounding ones.

So instead of saying that you are going to the “toilet”, you can say that you’re going to the “ladies” or to the “gents”. And instead of saying that someone is “obese” or “overweight”, you can say that s/he has a “fuller figure”.

More euphemisms

Do you remember that we spoke about euphemisms (in German: ‘beschönigende Umschreibungen’) some time ago? And why we use them?

Here’s a quick a reminder. There are certain topics we often don’t like talking about, because they make us feel uncomfortable. And to avoid using these rather harsh-sounding words, we choose to use more positive and polite-sounding ones.

So instead of saying that someone is “homeless”, one can say that he or she is “on the streets”. And instead of saying that someone has “died”, you might say someone has “kicked the bucket”.

Even if you don’t use these expressions yourself, and I suggest you don’t if you want to be understood internationally, you might hear them and not know what is meant.

Time to start a new job search!

It’s amazing just how many different words you can find to say that someone has been fired. Businessinsider.com has collected 46 words.

So instead of saying that someone was fired, you can say:

S/he was dismissed / discharged / asked to go / released / sacked / asked to resign / given an opportunity to start a new job search immediately.

That last phrase is particularly crazy, don’t you think?

More euphemisms

We spoke about euphemisms last week, remember? Those words and phrases that often try and make the negative seem positive by using more pleasant-sounding words.

I’ve often heard people say they thought certain goods “fell off the back of a lorry” to mean that they thought they had been “stolen”. You might have heard someone talk about another person as being “big-boned” instead of saying that they are “overweight” or “heavy”. Or perhaps that someone is “economically disadvantaged” instead of saying that they are “poor”.

I suggest that it’s better to avoid euphemisms if you want to be clear in your communication.