Food glorious food

Food glorious food

close up shot of breakfast plate with omelet and bread

A lot of people laugh about the British ‘kitchen’. Actually ‘kitchen’ is the place where the food is prepared! If you mean the food, you can either talk about the English ‘food, ‘cooking’ or ‘cuisine‘ (pronounced ‘kwizeen’).

I believe that the food in Britain is better than a lot of people think … Have you ever given it a try?

Tricky translations

Tricky translations

Translate

Translating from one language to another is often tricky. Do you know how to translate the following words and phrases without looking them up in a dictionary: ‘Kofferraum’, ‘Arbeitstier’, ‘Wohnmobil’, ‘Pechvogel’, ‘ich verstehe nur Bahnhof’ and ‘er ist ein hohes Tier’?

Test yourself with this lovely little quiz.

Little goose feet?

Little goose feet?

 

Inverted commas-001

I always forget the German word ‘Anführungszeichen’ when I need it. So I use either ‘Gänsefüßchen’ or ‘Tüddelchen’ (I lived in north Germany years ago!).

But what on earth do you say in English when you want to talk about those punctuation marks? Well, we call them quotation marks‘ or ‘inverted commas‘. Their form and position are a little bit different as you can see in the picture above. Both are positioned at the higher level. The first set looks like a 66 and the second set like a 99. 

Just thought you might like to know! 😉

 

 

Are you a lucky devil?

Are you a lucky devil?

Devil

No, you can’t say that your colleague is a ‘lucky mushroom’. That won’t work in English. But what you can say is that he or she is a ‘lucky devil‘. And if you can’t remember that, just say, “Oh lucky you” or “You are lucky”.

It’s a topic that Deutsche Welle has written about here.

One point I’d like to make, though. You can’t say that that your colleague ‘has luck’. ‘Glück haben’ is German! 😉