The early party

The early party

Birthday

It’s considered back luck to celebrate a birthday before the actual day in Germany (and even to give a present beforehand). However, it is allowed to “reinfeiern”. Now this is a really difficult word to explain in English because we don’t normally do it! So what could we say?

Would you agree with me that it means getting together on the evening before the actual birthday, anniversary or whatever and continuing to celebrate until the early hours of the next day?

See here what Deutsche Welle has written about the topic.

Are you thirsty?

Are you thirsty?

Beer

You’re on a business trip, are thirsty and don’t want to drink too much alcohol. A ‘Radler’ would be the perfect drink, but you don’t know how to order one. So you’ll just have to explain that it’s a mix of beer and Sprite.

The Deutsche Welle has a nice little article here on the topic.

Do something totally different

Do something totally different

Degree

There are some lovely words in German, aren’t there? One of them, ‘Quereinsteiger’, is very difficult to translate and doesn’t have an English equivalent. Perhaps it is because, as Deutsche Welle says, it’s not very common in Germany to study one subject and then work in a completely different field.

Take your vitamins

Take your vitamins

Vitamins

In Germany, people talk about getting jobs with the help of ‘Vitamin B’, and it’s believed to be one of the best ways to get a job. Through networking and building personal relationships. And although I’ve heard English speakers in Germany talking about getting a job with the help of ‘vitamin C’, I’ve never heard anyone use this term in England.

However, we do have a saying: “It’s not what you know, it’s who you know”.

Read Deutsche Welle’s very short article about this topic.