Kind regards

Typing

Do you use the same words again and again when closing an email? Why not be a little bit more creative?

A lot of people finish their email messages with “Regards”, “Kind regards” or “Best regards”. What about using the following now and again? Of course, they have to fit!

  • Best wishes
  • With thanks
  • Thanks again
  • Thank you for taking your time
  • Have a lovely day
  • Keep up the good work
  • Enjoy your holidays
  • Looking forward to your reply
  • Hope this helps
  • Let me know what you think
  • Take care

Do you have a favourite phrase when closing an email?

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4 Comments

  1. Olga

    I must admit that I almost always end my emails with “Best wishes,”, but this phrase quite often follows something like “Wish you a nice start to the week!” or “Wish you a great weekend!”. I must also admit that it never occurred to me that I can leave out “Best wishes” and finish with just “Wish you a lovely day, Olga”. Good to know!:-)

    Reply
    • Christine

      So you’ve learnt something new, Olga. Good to know! 😉

      Reply
  2. Sandra Dirks

    Ohhh, I’ve also learnt something new. I always ended with: Thanks. 🙂

    Thanks again,
    Sandra

    Reply
    • Christine

      Saying ‘thanks’ is a nice way to end an email, Sandra. Why not be more specific? Something like …

      Thank you for posting a comment today. It’s good to know that someone’s out there reading what I’ve written! 😉

      Best wishes
      Christine

      Reply

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Written by Christine Burgmer

3. October 2017