More punctuation marks

I always forget the correct German translation of “quotation marks” (also known as “inverted commas”). It’s “Anführungszeichen” (I’ve just looked it up). I always call them “Tüddelchen“. People often laugh at me when I use this word. However, I’ve just checked and found that it comes from the north of Germany. Perhaps that’s where I learned to use the word. I lived in Hamburg many years ago.

If you’re not sure how to use these punctuation marks, this article is sure to help you (link to: Purdue OWL). Just be careful! In English the form and the position of the inverted commas are different to German. The first set of inverted commas look like small figures of ‘6’ and the last set like small figures of ‘9’. Both are positioned at a higher level. Take a look at the picture here. Can you see the difference?

 

 

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Written by Christine Burgmer

8. December 2015