How to Cause Long-Term Change

How to Cause Long-Term Change

How to Cause Long-Term Change

It’s fairly easy to change our behaviours for a short period of time. But how can we make permanent changes?

Keynote speaker and best-selling author Andy Bounds has a wonderful technique of asking the same question again and again.

Andy recommends that we find something we want to improve at. We then ask someone we respect to relentlessly (unerbittlich) ask us whether we’ve improved at it, and to keep doing this until our new habit has become permanent.

Of course, we can do the same with our customers. And that’s exactly what Andy does.

Perhaps you have a habit you would like to change? Or can you see yourself using this strategy with your own customers? If so, I’d love to hear from you.

The Me You Can’t See

The Me You Can’t See

The Me You Can’t See

“The Me You Can’t See” is a new five-part docuseries co-created by Oprah Winfrey and Prince Harry about mental-health awareness, with stories from celebrities (like Lady Gaga, basketball player DeMar DeRozan and Robin Williams’ son, Zak) and from ordinary people.

You might like to watch the trailer on YouTube here, and share this with someone who needs to see this! 

How Can We Improve Our Focus?

How Can We Improve Our Focus?

How Can We Improve Our Focus?

If you’re like me and are optimistic when it comes to how much you can get done in a day, you might like to give the “Pomodoro Technique” a try.

It’s a popular time management method that can help us beat procrastination and improve our focus. And it works!

The only challenge is actually doing it on a regular basis!

So how does it work?

1. Prepare a list of your tasks.
2. Choose one task on the list.
3. Set a timer for 25 minutes.
4. Work on your task until the timer rings. (Keep a check on a sheet of paper.)
5. Take a 5 minute break. (You’ve just completed your first Pomodoro.)
6. Repeat steps 1-4 three times, and then take a longer 15 – 30 minute break.

And that’s it.

(This technique was developed by Francesco Cirillo in the late 1980s. If you want to know more about this technique, take a look here.)

3 Words Germans Think Are English

3 Words Germans Think Are English

3 Words Germans Think Are English

A few weeks ago we talked about three English words that have made their way into the German language, but take on a completely different meaning.

Let’s look at three more today: handy, smoking and box.

If you tell me about your ‘handy’, I’ll understand you because a lot of Germans use the same word. Other English native speakers will probably be confused, because for them it’s a ‘mobile‘, ‘mobile phone‘ or ‘cell phone‘. 

You might tell me that you or your partner is going to wear a ‘smoking’ to a special event. An English person won’t understand you. The word you need in Britain is a ‘dinner jacket‘ and in America a ‘tuxedo‘. (However, according to Moss Bros., ‘tuxedo’ is becoming more common in Britain now, too.)

You have a stereo system? You might tell me about your ‘boxes’. I’m not sure if a native speaker would understand you. Probably not. You need to talk about the ‘loudspeakers‘. 

Have you heard people using these words incorrectly? You might like to pass this message on to them.

 


The Secrets to Success

The Secrets to Success

The Secrets to Success

“There are no secrets to success. It is the result of preparation, hard work, and learning from failure.”
Colin Powell

Whether we’re learning to play chess or learning a language, achieving our goals rarely happens by accident.

We might see other people succeeding, but we have no idea how much preparation and hard work went into their success.

And the only way to become successful in any area of life is to be prepared to make mistakes. It’s what we do after making those mistakes that counts.

If we’re worried about making mistakes, we’ll never get to speak a language. It’s only by making mistakes that we can improve.

So let’s approach failure positively—as a  way of learning. 

Here’s to your success!